Planning, implementation, and operation

Mainstreaming adaptation means to increasingly take onboard water as a structural agent in spatial planning. Often water has been an element which is added at the end of a planning process, as a technical add on. Bringing in water more centrally in the planning process, means that collaboration between sectors is needed such as water professionals and spatial planners. It also means a greater attention to risk considerations in spatial planning. This entails involving both risk professionals active in preparedness, response, and recovery activities, as well as understanding how risks can be prevented by addressing unsustainable development. This also entails understanding climate risks, including the challenges of tomorrow, and the required decision-making under uncertainty.

Planning Processes

For all planning processes, it is essential that planning is realised in implementation. This includes providing for essential elements of operation and maintenance to make solutions sustainable over the long term. There is a need for planners to understand the realities of implementation to put in place the right enablers such as financial incentives, and policies etc. For adaptation, this means the need for integrating new solutions (innovations) in old systems and working processes. 

Articles

Testing of rain bed
Article

Testing rainbeds in Oslo - correcting technical design issues

Several rain beds and open storm water solutions have been implemented in Oslo, Norway - especially since the new strategy was put in place. 

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Tree in a city
Article

Mainstreaming Nature based Solutions

Professor Christine Wamsler explains what adaptation mainstreaming means for Nature based Solutions.  

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Crane on a boat
Photo: Sergei Dubrovskii (istock)

This section will be expanded to also include information on:

  • Decision-making under uncertainty
  • Mobilizing partnerships
  • Strengthening links to disaster risk reduction such as preparedness, response and building back better
  • Knowledge and capacity development on risk and adaptation
People from above - organised so they look like a graph
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Get organised and strengthen institutional capacity

This means creating or assigning an organizational structure to coordinate and be responsible for the climate adaptation mainstreaming process.

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Assess climate risk

Climate risk assessments identify the likelihood of current and future climate hazards and their impacts.

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Two people discussing a plan
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Risk dialogues and strategising

When climate risks have been assessed for multiple actors and sectors, these need to be coordinated and prioritizations worked out.

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River from the sky
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Financing

Sufficient financial resources and capacity to access available resources are critical for adaptation. 

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Different Colour Leaves
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Policies and regulations

The right policies and regulations can boost action and support implementation of climate adaptation.

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Faults in rock formations
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Innovation, evaluation, learning and behaviour change

Adaptation will be a collective effort, meaning that many people from various sectors and levels will have to collaborate. 

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